The Role of Play in Sensory Processing Disorder

A close up of a bunch of colorful lights emphasizing sensory processing disorder.

Key Takeaway:

  • Play plays a crucial role in the development of children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), promoting sensory integration and overall development.
  • Play provides children with SPD with the opportunity to reach developmental milestones and enhance their daily functioning.
  • Parents and caregivers play a vital role in facilitating play for children with SPD, collaborating with occupational therapists to develop effective play-based interventions.

Play holds a crucial role in the lives of children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), providing them with valuable opportunities for growth and development. This section will begin by providing a clear definition and comprehensive overview of SPD. From there, we will highlight the significance of play in supporting the well-being and progress of these children, shedding light on the positive impact it can have on their sensory integration, social skills, and overall quality of life.

Definition and overview of Sensory Processing Disorder

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) is a neurological condition. It affects how people process and respond to sensory info from their environment. It’s not due to a delay in perceiving the info, but trouble organizing and understanding it.

The 7 sensory systems – tactile, olfactory, auditory, visual, gustatory, vestibular, and proprioceptive – play a big role in SPD. They work together to provide input about the physical and social world. But, in those with SPD, these systems may be over-responsive or under-responsive. This can lead to challenges with daily activities and development.

The effects of SPD on daily functioning and development vary. For instance, children with SPD may have difficulties with activities needing specific sensory processing skills, like dressing or eating certain textures of food. They may also have trouble regulating emotions and behavior due to sensory overload or seeking certain sensations. Furthermore, they may experience delays or difficulties in motor skills, executive functioning skills, social interaction, and academics.

Play is crucial for sensory integration and development with SPD. Activities are designed to address the individual’s special sensory needs and preferences. The aim is to explore different sensations through textures or movement. It encourages engagement of the senses and helps build foundational skills.

Strategies tailored to the needs of those with SPD during play activities can help. This includes play examples that target the sensory processing issues, and strategies such as deep pressure touch or vestibular stimulation. These strategies help children regulate their responses to sensory input.

Using accessories and materials during play activities can give more sensory input. Different textures, weights, and scents can provide a controlled and structured sensory experience. Incorporating sight, sound, touch, taste and movement can create a full sensory experience.

Parents and caregivers play a vital role in facilitating play for those with SPD. They not only guide, but create an environment that promotes sensory integration and exploration. Collaborating with occupational therapists can be beneficial in developing effective interventions tailored to the child’s needs.

Play-based interventions and therapies offered by occupational therapists are effective for SPD. They involve activities that target the sensory processing struggles while helping overall development. Techniques like sensory integration involve purposeful activities to help regulate responses to sensations.

Importance of play in the development of children with Sensory Processing Disorder

Play is essential for children with SPD (Sensory Processing Disorder). It includes difficulties in processing sensory info from the environment, which affects daily activities and growth.

SPD involves the seven sensory systems: tactile, auditory, visual, olfactory, gustatory, vestibular, and proprioceptive. In kids with SPD, these systems can be over- or under-responsive, making it hard to regulate sensory input and take part in activities.

Play is key for sensory integration and growth in kids with SPD. It lets them explore, experiment, and learn through hands-on experiences. It also helps them develop skills like balance, coordination, social interaction, problem-solving, and motor planning.

To encourage play, it’s important to provide tailored interventions that align with the child’s needs. Occupational therapists work with parents and caregivers to develop play-based approaches.

Adding sensory input to play activities further amplifies its benefits. This can be done by using sensory accessories or incorporating auditory or visual stimuli. This helps kids with SPD regulate their responses to different types of sensory input while playing.

SPD: a thrilling rollercoaster ride for the senses!

Understanding Sensory Processing Disorder

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) affects daily functioning and development, impacting individuals in various ways. By understanding the seven sensory systems and their role in SPD, we can gain valuable insights into this complex disorder. Exploring how SPD affects sensory processing and its implications on everyday life, this section sheds light on the challenges faced by those with this condition.

Explanation of the seven sensory systems and their role in Sensory Processing Disorder

The seven sensory systems – auditory, visual, tactile, olfactory, gustatory, vestibular, and proprioceptive – are integral to Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). This condition occurs when the brain struggles to respond to info from the senses. These systems work together to process and combine sensory input, allowing us to navigate the world.

SPD can lead to the sensory systems not working properly. They can be overly sensitive to certain stimuli. For instance, loud sounds could be unbearable and it may be hard to filter out background noise. Bright lights and visual info like reading or tracking objects may also become a challenge.

Under-responsiveness is another issue, where not enough sensory input is received. This can lead to difficulty with daily activities and development. It can cause discomfort with touch, be it materials or certain textures. It can also manifest in heightened sensitivity to smells and tastes.

The vestibular system, governing balance and spatial orientation, can be affected too. This causes balance issues or dizziness during movement. The proprioceptive system offers body position and movement info. People with SPD may find this hard, causing difficulties with navigating their environment.

To assist those with SPD, healthcare professionals must understand the role of these seven sensory systems. Recognizing the challenges and sensitivities associated with each system is important for diagnosis and interventions. This way, people with SPD can have targeted support and navigate life more comfortably.

Impact of Sensory Processing Disorder on daily functioning and development

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) has a great effect on individuals’ daily lives and growth. SPD affects how people process and react to sensory information from their surroundings, which can cause issues in many areas. For instance, those with SPD may have problems regulating themselves, focusing, motor skills, socializing, and taking part in everyday tasks. These struggles can stop them from succeeding at home, school, and work, as well as forming meaningful relationships.

To comprehend the impact of SPD, it is important to understand the seven sensory systems affected. These are: tactile (touch), proprioceptive (body position and movement), vestibular (balance and spatial orientation), visual (sight), auditory (hearing), gustatory (taste), and olfactory (smell). Someone with SPD may be hypersensitive or hyposensitive in one or more of these areas, making it hard to interpret sensory input which can result in either avoiding certain stimuli or seeking out intense experiences.

The consequences of SPD reach further than immediate issues. Children with SPD may find it hard to engage in play activities that are essential for their physical, emotional, cognitive, and social development. Play gives them the opportunity to investigate their environment, practice motor skills, interact with others, manage emotions, and sharpen problem-solving abilities. But SPD can make it hard to take part in certain types of play due to hypersensitivities or the inability to combine sensory input.

It is crucial for caregivers to understand how to aid children with SPD in their play experiences. With examples tailored to the child’s individual needs and strategies to address sensory processing problems, parents can assist in development and integration. Occupational therapists are also important in working with parents to craft successful play-based interventions that target certain sensory difficulties and support progress.

The Importance of Play in Sensory Processing Disorder

When it comes to Sensory Processing Disorder, play serves a crucial role in promoting sensory integration and development in children. In this section, we will explore the importance of play and its benefits for children with Sensory Processing Disorder in reaching developmental milestones. From enhancing sensory integration to fostering crucial skills, play becomes a powerful tool in supporting the needs of these children. So, let’s delve into the vital role that play plays in addressing the challenges associated with Sensory Processing Disorder.

Role of play in promoting sensory integration and development in children with Sensory Processing Disorder

Play plays a big role in helping kids with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). SPD is when the brain has trouble processing and responding to sensory info like touch, sound, taste, smell, vision, movement, and body awareness. Through play, kids with SPD can do activities that help with sensory integration. Sensory integration is when the brain understands and acts on sensory info.

For example, playing with things of different textures, like sand or water, can help with tactile sensitivity and tolerance. Doing physical activities, like swinging or jumping, can improve balance and vestibular processing. And playing music or listening to different sounds can help with auditory processing.

Play also helps kids develop and learn how to interact with their environment, make social connections, regulate emotions, and gain cognitive abilities. One success story is of a 3-year-old boy, Ethan, with hypersensitivity to touch. His therapist used play-based interventions to help him get used to different fabrics and textures. Through these games, Ethan was able to wear clothing without distress.

Play is an important tool for helping kids with SPD reach developmental milestones.

Benefits of play for children with Sensory Processing Disorder in reaching developmental milestones

Play offers many advantages to kids with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). It can help them reach developmental goals.

  • Improved sensory integration: Play offers chances for SPD children to engage their senses and process input. Through play, kids can practice responding to different sensations leading to better integration of these senses.
  • Boosted motor skills: When playing, kids use movement and physical activity which helps them build motor skills. By taking part in play activities, they can strengthen muscles, improve coordination, balance, and physical abilities.
  • Fostering social interaction: Play gives SPD kids a natural setting to interact with peers. With cooperative play or group activities, they can learn communication skills, share experiences, take turns, and solve problems together.
  • Cognitive development: Play activities stimulate cognitive growth in SPD children by encouraging exploration, imagination, creativity, and problem-solving. Through building blocks or pretend play scenarios, these activities can promote thinking, spatial awareness, language acquisition, and other cognitive abilities.

Also, play improves emotional regulation for SPD kids. By providing a structured yet flexible atmosphere, where they can explore sensory input and regulate responses, play assists these kids to better manage anxieties or stress linked with sensory sensitivities.

Strategies for Encouraging Play for Children with Sensory Processing Disorder

Encouraging play for children with Sensory Processing Disorder is key to their development. By providing tailored play examples and opportunities, as well as incorporating specific strategies to address sensory processing problems, we can create an enriching environment for these children.

Providing appropriate play examples and opportunities tailored to the needs of children with Sensory Processing Disorder

It’s key to grasp the special sensory needs of children with Sensory Processing Disorder to provide them with adapted play examples and opportunities. Each child can be sensitive or like different senses. By watching their reactions, carers can spot activities they’ll enjoy and find stimulating.

Creating a secure, encouraging atmosphere is crucial. This could involve clearing mess, or using soft lighting to make a relaxed vibe. Having a selection of toys that trigger different senses can upgrade the play experience. For example, objects with different textures, or toys with varying levels of resistance can assist with tactile discovery and build fine motor skills.

Carers should bear in mind the pace and complexity of activities – not too much info or stimulation at once, but also not too easy or dull.

Most importantly, carers should take part in play with these children. They can give guidance, reassurance, and emotional support, as well as helping them to socialize and develop relationships with peers.

By following these steps, carers and parents can give kids with Sensory Processing Disorder suitable play examples and opportunities. This helps them grow and cope with daily life.

Incorporating specific play strategies to address sensory processing problems

To tackle sensory processing issues, it’s essential to use some play tactics. Here’s a five-step guide to provide help:

  1. Find individual needs: Assess the child’s sensory processing difficulties. Understand their preferences and sensitivities so you can customize the strategies.
  2. Make a sensory-friendly setting: Modify the play area to reduce distractions. Cut down on visual stimuli and maintain appropriate light levels. This could enhance the child’s focus during play.
  3. Do structured activities: Design activities that target the sensory systems affected by Sensory Processing Disorder. For example, include tactile exploration for children with tactile defensiveness or add vestibular movement for those with gravitational insecurity.
  4. Use adaptive equipment: Introduce special toys or gear that provides extra sensory input or helps with motor planning. Weighted vests, fidget toys, or therapy balls might be useful.
  5. Encourage exposure and desensitization: Gradually offer challenging stimuli in a managed way. This helps children tolerate and become less reactive to sensory triggers over time.

By following these steps, you can adopt a complete approach to address the particular sensory processing issues faced by people with Sensory Processing Disorder.

Pro Tip: Be flexible when incorporating play strategies. What works for one child may not work for another. Adaptation based on individual needs is the key to successful engagement and progress in sensory integration during play.

Sensory Input in Play: Where fun and sensory stimulation come together, helping children with Sensory Processing Disorder explore the world through playful sensations.

Incorporating Sensory Input in Play Activities

Engaging in play activities can significantly impact sensory processing disorder. Discover the powerful ways in which sensory input can be incorporated into play for individuals with this condition. From utilizing sensory accessories and materials to stimulating various sensory channels, this section will uncover the strategies and techniques that enhance sensory experiences during play. Harness the potential of play to promote sensory integration and overall well-being.

Using sensory accessories and materials to provide sensory input during play

Using sensory accessories and materials during play is a great way to give sensory input to children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). These accessories are designed to engage the tactile, visual, auditory, and proprioceptive senses. With these incorporated in play activities, SPD kids can get the sensory input they need. This helps them regulate their responses to sensory stimuli, improve attention, and boost functional skills.

By having sensory accessories and materials in play, SPD children can actively interact with their environment and get targeted sensory input. For example, textured toys and surfaces stimulate the tactile system and help kids to develop appropriate touch responses. Colorful visuals and interactive lights promote visual processing. Noise-making and musical toys give auditory input and aid in auditory discrimination. Additionally, pushing or pulling heavy objects during activities provide proprioceptive input and enhance body awareness and muscle strength.

Using sensory accessories and materials during play lets SPD kids experience a variety of sensory stimuli in enjoyable and secure circumstances. This encourages repeated exposure to different sensations. Over time, they build tolerance and develop more adaptive responses.

Incorporating sensory input channels in play activities, imagination and all five senses come together, creating a sensory overload that’s not at all overwhelming.

Incorporating various sensory input channels in play activities

Kids with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) need sensory input. Incorporating it into play activities can help their development. The seven systems – touch, taste, smell, hearing, vision, proprioception, and vestibular – all give input. Engaging these during play can help kids regulate and integrate sensory info better.

Use sensory accessories such as textured or scented objects for tactile and olfactory input. Different sound or visual cues stimulate the auditory and visual systems. This way, kids learn to respond better to different stimulations.

Plus, this aides their overall development. Through play, they explore and move. This helps develop motor skills and coordination. It also supports their cognitive and social-emotional growth.

Parents and caregivers: use playtime to help kids with SPD! It’s a great way to support their development.

Guidelines for Parents and Caregivers

To better support children with Sensory Processing Disorder, parents and caregivers play a pivotal role in facilitating play experiences. By collaborating with occupational therapists, effective play-based interventions can be developed. Through these guidelines, parents and caregivers can gain insights on how to create a sensory-friendly environment and engage in activities that support sensory integration. Let’s explore how play can be used as a powerful tool to nurture and enhance the sensory development of children with SPD.

Role of parents and caregivers in facilitating play for children with Sensory Processing Disorder

Parents and caregivers are key to helping children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). Understanding their needs and challenges is the first step.

Provide play examples and opportunities that suit the child’s needs. Incorporate specific play strategies to tackle sensory processing problems.

Collaborate with occupational therapists for effective interventions. That’s the way to go!

Collaboration with occupational therapists to develop effective play-based interventions

Occupational therapists provide invaluable insight into the sensory processing difficulties of children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). Their expertise in the seven sensory systems involved in SPD helps them identify areas of difficulty. This knowledge is used to develop strategies for play-based interventions that target the individual needs of each child.

Occupational therapists also facilitate communication between parents, caregivers, teachers, and other healthcare professionals. By sharing information and resources, they build a comprehensive understanding of a child’s needs and strengths.

Therefore, collaboration with occupational therapists is essential for the development of successful play-based interventions for those with SPD.

Ready to have some fun? Try these creative therapies and interventions for sensory success!

Play-Based Interventions and Therapies for Sensory Processing Disorder

Play-based interventions and therapies serve as effective ways to address Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). In this section, we will explore an overview of these interventions and how occupational therapists utilize them. Additionally, we will delve into the application of sensory integration techniques within play-based interventions, thus providing valuable insights into the role of play in managing SPD.

Overview of play-based interventions and therapies used by occupational therapists for Sensory Processing Disorder

Play-based interventions are a common way for occupational therapists to manage Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). Structured activities are designed to help the sensory integration and development of children with SPD. Playful elements create a fun, engaging environment.

Occupational therapists use a mix of sensory items and materials to stimulate the sensory systems involved. This may involve tactile materials such as sand or clay, or vestibular input with swings or trampolines. The goal is to help children regulate their responses to sensory stimuli.

Play-based interventions also incorporate strategies that address the individual sensory processing issues. Activities like deep pressure touch or joint compressions can help with tactile defensiveness. Pretend play can help practice social interactions and develop emotional regulation.

In summary, play-based interventions offer a great way to reach developmental milestones, express creativity, and problem-solve. Occupational therapists tailor these interventions to each child’s unique needs, helping improve their overall functioning.

Description of sensory integration techniques and their application in play-based interventions

Sensory integration is key for play-based interventions in kids with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). Occupational therapists use strategies to help address sensory issues. They use play examples and activities tailored for the individual needs of each child.

Strategies are used to target sensory integration challenges. Meaningful play experiences help children with SPD. Sensory integration techniques are used during activities which provide sensory input. Accessories and materials, such as textured objects and weighted toys, are used to give tactile and proprioceptive input.

Therapists incorporate different sensory inputs into play activities. These include vision, hearing, touch, taste, smell, body awareness and movement. By using sensory integration techniques in play-based interventions, SPD children can process sensory info effectively. This helps with daily functioning and overall development. Targeted sensory input during play can help children with SPD develop adaptive responses for positive experiences.

Future Directions and Research Needs

Future Directions and Research Needs in the role of play in Sensory Processing Disorder: Exploring the current evidence, research gaps, and identifying future directions for rigorous research and evidence-based interventions.

Discussion of current evidence and research gaps in the role of play in Sensory Processing Disorder

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) is a condition that affects how people process and respond to sensory information. Play has a role in managing SPD, so evidence and research gaps must be discussed. This is essential for making play-based interventions and therapies for those with SPD more effective.

More evidence is needed to support play as a therapeutic tool. Currently, there’s growing recognition of the importance of play in aiding sensory integration and development for those with SPD. Studies should focus on the types of activities, frequency, and duration, and how it impacts the sensory system and daily functioning.

Research is also needed to identify strategies within play-based interventions that address sensory processing issues in individuals with SPD. To provide the best outcomes, healthcare professionals need to understand which types of play strategies are most beneficial for improving sensory integration and meeting developmental milestones.

Onward! Finding evidence-based treasure for the management of Sensory Processing Disorder in unexplored frontiers.

Identification of future directions for rigorous research and evidence-based interventions

Identifying potential paths for research and evidence-based interventions for Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) is key. Novel assessment tools and intervention approaches can help us understand SPD better and improve treatment outcomes.

We must pinpoint specific areas to investigate within the realm of SPD. This includes:

  • The influence of sensory systems on day-to-day activities and development.
  • Exploring the role of play in aiding sensory integration in children with SPD.
  • Examining the benefits of play for achieving developmental milestones.

Parents, caregivers, and occupational therapists must collaborate when creating evidence-based interventions for children with SPD. They must design play examples to fit the child’s needs, and incorporate play strategies to address their sensory processing issues.

To conclude, future research and evidence-based interventions in SPD should focus on novel assessment tools, intervention approaches, sensory systems’ impact, the role of play, and collaboration between parents/therapists. Play your way to sensory success and leave those processing problems in the dust!

Conclusion

Play holds tremendous significance in the realm of Sensory Processing Disorder. As we draw this discussion to a close, we will summarize the crucial role that play serves in addressing the challenges faced by individuals with SPD. Furthermore, we urge for greater integration of play-based approaches in the management of SPD, emphasizing the potential it holds for enhancing the lives of those affected. Together, let us embrace the power of play in unlocking new possibilities and fostering growth for individuals living with Sensory Processing Disorder.

Summary of the importance of play in Sensory Processing Disorder

Play is key for managing and developing children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). Through play, these kids can engage in activities to integrate their senses and support their growth. This article will cover the role of play in SPD and its benefits.

  1. Play supports sensory integration: Play lets children with SPD interact with different textures, sounds, movements, and visuals. This helps them develop better sensory processing skills.
  2. Play encourages developmental progress: Kids with SPD may struggle to reach milestones. Play offers a structured environment to practice and refine their skills, aiding them in reaching those milestones.
  3. Tailored play examples and strategies: To help children with SPD, it’s important to give them appropriate play opportunities that address their sensory issues.
  4. Sensory input during play activities: Adding sensory items like fidget toys, weighted blankets, and textured surfaces to play activities can enhance the benefits for children with SPD.
  5. Collaboration with occupational therapists: Parents and caregivers should involve occupational therapists in creating play interventions that meet the child’s individual needs.

To get the best results for kids with SPD, play-based approaches must be integrated into therapeutic interventions. This gives children with SPD the chance to engage in meaningful play experiences that support their sensory processing and development.

Therefore, research and evidence-based interventions need to be promoted to boost understanding and implementation of play-based approaches in practice. Failing to do so might cause these children to miss out on the critical part play plays in their development and well-being.

Call to action for further integration of play-based approaches in the management of Sensory Processing Disorder.

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) affects how an individual processes sensory information from their seven systems. Play is key for the development of children with SPD. It helps with sensory integration and reaching milestones.

Play is a great tool to help with sensory integration and development. It provides a controlled and enjoyable environment for the child. They can engage their senses and practice processing sensory information. Tailor activities to the child’s needs for the right level of challenge and support.

Play also helps children with SPD reach important developmental milestones. Through activities that involve different sensory inputs, they can enhance motor skills, social interactions, and cognitive abilities. Learning and adapting to the surroundings happens through play.

Parents and caregivers need to provide the right play examples and opportunities for children with SPD. Occupational therapists can help create effective interventions. Accessories and materials can provide extra sensory input, like fidget toys and textured surfaces. This allows the child to use all senses at once and process information effectively.

More research is needed on the role of play in managing SPD. Current evidence supports the importance of play for these children, but more research is required. Evidence-based interventions can improve the integration of play-based approaches, leading to improved outcomes.

Some Facts About the Role of Play in Sensory Processing Disorder:

  • ✅ Sensory processing disorder (SPD) is a disruption of the balance of multiple sensory systems, causing children to appear clumsy and react defensively to certain stimuli. (Source: The Genius of Play)
  • ✅ Collaborating with an occupational therapist is important for parents of children with SPD to understand their specific sensory systems and how to help them. (Source: The Genius of Play)
  • ✅ Sensory processing and modulation is the ability to organize sensory information from seven systems in a way that allows for the appropriate response. (Source: The Genius of Play)
  • ✅ Children with SPD may struggle with physical skills and emotional reactions during play, such as taking turns, impulse control, attention, and dealing with competition. (Source: The Genius of Play)
  • ✅ Engaging in different play activities stimulates the sensory systems, allowing them to process input more effectively and contribute to learning, growth, and sensory development. (Source: NSUWorks)

FAQs about The Role Of Play In Sensory Processing Disorder

FAQ 1: What is the role of play in sensory processing disorder?

Play plays a crucial role in the development of sensory processing in children with sensory processing disorder. Through play, children can engage multiple sensory systems simultaneously, allowing them to process sensory input more effectively. Play activities such as swinging, climbing, rolling, digging, spinning, exploring, imagining, creating, building, and making a mess contribute to their learning, growth, and sensory development.

FAQ 2: How does play support occupational development in children with sensory processing disorder?

Play is essential for the occupational development of children with sensory processing disorder. It helps them develop skills such as taking turns, impulse control, attention, dealing with competition, and emotional regulation. By engaging in play activities, children with sensory processing disorder can learn to navigate and adapt to sensory challenges, promoting their overall occupational development.

FAQ 3: What are some specific play strategies for children with sensory processing disorder?

– For children who struggle with physical skills during play, activities like swinging, climbing, and rolling can help improve coordination and body awareness.
– For children who are sensitive to different textures and temperatures, using mess-free toys can allow them to explore touch/tactile input without triggering negative reactions.
– For children who crave pressure, engaging in activities that increase body awareness and provide safe interactions can be beneficial.
– For children who have difficulty with social interaction, structured games and play with others can help them develop social skills like taking turns and playing in an organized manner.

FAQ 4: How can parents support play for children with sensory processing disorder?

Parents can support play for children with sensory processing disorder by paying attention to activities and environments that calm or re-focus their child. By using these activities, parents can help their child feel comfortable and engaged in play. It is important for parents to collaborate with occupational therapists to gain a better understanding of their child’s specific sensory systems and determine appropriate play strategies.

FAQ 5: What is the importance of sensory processing and modulation in play for children with sensory processing disorder?

Sensory processing and modulation refer to the ability to organize sensory information from multiple sensory systems in a way that allows for an appropriate response. When children receive sensory information in a balanced way, they can engage in play activities, be productive, and demonstrate safe behaviors. For children with sensory processing disorder, play can help stimulate their sensory systems and improve their ability to interpret and respond to sensory input.

FAQ 6: What is the significance of emerging understanding in the relationship between play and sensory processing for children with sensory processing disorder?

Based on the current evidence, there is an emerging understanding of the relationship between play and sensory processing in children with sensory processing disorder. Occupational therapists can gain insights into this relationship, emphasizing its importance in the occupational development of children. However, more rigorous research is needed to further explore and establish the specific benefits and strategies of play for children with sensory processing disorder.

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